1. 20:53 9th Apr 2014

    Notes: 3054

    Reblogged from wendesgray

    image: Download

    (Source: iannorrisdaily)

     
  2. 20:19

    Notes: 149

    Reblogged from nprmusic

    nprmusic:

Aimee Mann + Ted Leo = The Both at NPR’s Tiny Desk.
Bonus! Stream the debut album on NPR Music’s First Listen. 

    nprmusic:

    Aimee Mann + Ted Leo = The Both at NPR’s Tiny Desk.

    Bonus! Stream the debut album on NPR Music’s First Listen. 

     
  3. 19:32 5th Apr 2014

    Notes: 2104

    Reblogged from ulikepnutbuttrandilikeyou

    newsfrompoems:

    Meg Allen, from Butch

     
  4. 19:51 31st Mar 2014

    Notes: 21

    Reblogged from stephontherun

    image: Download

    stephontherun:

Just for good measure, some greenery from OR.

    stephontherun:

    Just for good measure, some greenery from OR.

     
  5. 19:34 26th Mar 2014

    Notes: 53756

    Reblogged from bossypants

    (Source: pineyewoman)

     
  6. 20:46 24th Mar 2014

    Notes: 27396

    Reblogged from thruhiker

    image: Download

    (Source: taylorwildfree)

     
  7. 19:52

    Notes: 15285

    Reblogged from wendesgray

    image: Download

    demuresoul:

I need this.

    demuresoul:

    I need this.

    (Source: campwanderlust)

     
  8. 16:53 23rd Mar 2014

    Notes: 4147

    Reblogged from jennlevo

    If you have any doubt that the hashtag is a frighteningly powerful tool in our modern vocabulary, imagine a person you care about texting you that song’s title line out of the blue: “You’re beautiful.” Now think of the same person texting, “You’re #beautiful.” The second one is jokey, ironic, distant—and hey, maybe that’s what that person was going for. But it also hammers home that point that the internet too often asserts: You’re not as original as you once thought. “Beautiful” is analog, unquantifiable, one-in-a-million. #Beautiful, on the other hand, is crowded terrain. Ten more people have just tweeted about something or someone #beautiful since you started reading this sentence.

    As more and more of our daily interactions become text-based — people preferring texting to phone calls, workplaces that rely heavily email and instant messaging—we’re developing ways to stretch our written language so it can communicate more nuance, so we can tell people what we mean without accidentally leading them on or pissing them off. Periods have becomemore forceful, commas less essential, and over the last few years, the hashtag has morphed into something resembling the fabled sarcasm font—the official keystroke of irony. Putting a hashtag in front of something you text, email, or IM to someone is a sly way of saying “I’m joking,” or maybe more accurately, “I mean this and I don’t at the same time.”

    — 

    The #Art of the Hashtag

    Thanks to Twitter, the hashtag has become an important linguistic shortcut. But while everyone from Robin Thicke to Beyoncé has used the symbol as part of their art, only a few have truly taken advantage of its culture-jamming possibilities.

    Via @pitchforkmedia

    (via npr)

    #cool

    (via abbylwatson)

     
  9. 15:50

    Notes: 13833

    Reblogged from aintstandard

    (Source: cosmosuniverse)

     
  10. 14:15

    Notes: 173570

    Reblogged from jennlevo

    image: Download

    (Source: lerobinsnest)